95_Theses

It’s About the Future

Archive for the ‘conservatism’ Category

why I’ll vote for Thompson

Posted by Citizen on October 6, 2007

I’ll get the easy shot out of the way first: I’ll vote for Thompson because he is NOT McCain, Romney, or Giuliani. That’s the easy part, but it’s not the real reason I’ll vote for Thompson.

J. Peter Mulhern has admirably framed the topic and lays out the best analysis I’ve read yet. I recommend you read the whole thing so you can see what I’m leaving out. This pull quote explains why I’ll vote Thompson:

Fred Thompson is quite different from the other candidates. The conventional critiques of his candidacy all say much more about his strengths than his weaknesses.
Dick Morris complains that he is too lazy to prepare well-scripted answers to questions about local issues. In Florida, for example he deflected a question about the Terri Schiavo case saying he wasn’t familiar with the details but in general he preferred local answers to local questions. To a question about oil drilling in the Everglades he said that he wasn’t aware of major oil resources there but that we couldn’t be in the business of putting energy resources off limits.
Each of these answers was perfectly reasonable and part of a package that is likely to have broad appeal. Neither shows a lazy candidate. They both show a mature and sensible candidate who isn’t willing to pander. Thompson, unlike all the others, has important themes to project and can’t be bothered to pick up a few supporters here and there by promising to serve the interests of those few at the expense of the many.
This isn’t politics as usual in 21st Century America, but it is likely to sell. When it does, it will make a mockery of Dick Morris’s entire career, which was grounded on the idea that pandering conquers all.
What about Thompson’s experience? He never ran anything. Mitt was Governor of Massachusetts and a successful business executive. Rudy was Mayor of New York. Shouldn’t those qualifications trump a lawyer who is also an actor and used to be a senator? They would if we were hiring a manager in chief, but we aren’t.
We have gotten so used to speaking of the President of the United States “running the country” that most of us no longer notice how unrealistic and unAmerican that expression is. The whole point of the American Revolution was to establish a country without anyone to run it. We don’t want or need a president who is inclined to run things. We need a President who leads and inspires. Fred, with his non-managerial background, is the only candidate of either party who seems to get this.
Much ink has been wasted making the obvious point that Thompson is not an “outsider.” After a long career in Washington as a staffer and Senator, as a lawyer and a lobbyist Fred Thompson is as well connected as any “insider” here. But for his entire career Thompson has stood outside the bipartisan consensus that, when it comes to government activity, more is better. His commitment to governmental modesty is most often expressed as concern for the principle of federalism. That commitment put him on the short end of some very lopsided votes as a Senator…

Thompson’s commitment to governmental modesty makes him the only serious candidate for president who isn’t part of the bipartisan Party of Government. He is the only candidate qualified to build on the success of Ronald Reagan and the only candidate who can counter the Democrat drive for more socialism, particularly as it applies to health care.
Reagan turned America away from the socialist morass of the 1930’s and reconnected us with our deepest political traditions. He reminded us that we don’t want a government, let alone a President, to run the country. Unfortunately, his successors never understood this essential pillar of Reagan’s success. When George W. Bush perpetrated the atrocious statement that “when somebody hurts government has got to move,” the Republican break with Reagan was complete.
Fred Thompson isn’t Ronald Reagan. But he can restore the Republican Party to Reagan’s default settings. He can make the GOP once again the party of the American Revolution and distinguish it sharply from the party of the French, Russian, Chinese, and Cuban Revolutions.
Does Thompson have the rhetorical skills to be the leader we need? Let’s put him to the same test both Romney and Giuliani just flunked. Does Thompson understand that our problem with terrorism is now primarily an Iranian problem? Can he face that problem and discuss it in terms most Americans will understand?
Thompson’s reaction to General Petraeus’ recent testimony before Congress suggests that he can. Before Petraeus said a word everyone knew that our efforts in Iraq have become vastly more successful under his command. Everyone understood that Al Qaeda and Iran’s proxies will probably be humiliated in Iraq unless they can adjust to the tactics we are now using with such success. The $64,000 question was this: What is Iran doing to forestall humiliation in Iraq and what will we do to stop them?
General Petraeus dropped some very interesting hints on this subject and Thompson zeroed in on them. His statement on the subject was simple and direct: “Gen. Petraeus’ report also leaves me even more concerned about Iran’s role in Iraq. Iran is headed down a dangerous path, and President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad must understand that.”
Thompson reinforced this barely veiled threat with his reaction to a controversy over Ahmadinejad’s request to visit Ground Zero while he is in New York to address the UN. He said “I wouldn’t let him in the country.” He went on to say , according to the Dallas Morning News, that “the Iranian regime was a threat to Americans and should be dealt with accordingly.”
At last a candidate who understands that Iran is at war with us and who is willing to speak as though we are at war with Iran. It’s a bonus that he speaks in clear declarative sentences and that everything in his manner and appearance demands that you take him seriously.
When Thompson speaks the chattering class often sputters that he is too laid back, even soporific. People who have never seen him speak themselves often adopt this critique and endlessly repeat the same clich├ęs on various conservative websites – “lackluster,” “underwhelming,” “tired,” “old,” “no fire in the belly.” Conservatives are hungry for a Hillary slayer and many of them fear that a thoughtful, deliberate senior statesman can’t possibly play that role. They are wrong.
Watch a Thompson speech that was widely panned as dull. Just because Fred talks slowly doesn’t mean he’s stupid, or uninspiring. Notice that he is saying important things and saying them well. How many politicians can talk about Russell Kirk’s The Conservative Mind in terms which indicate that he has both read and understood it?
Consider that Fred’s calm, sensible demeanor permits him to say things that would terrify many ordinary voters coming from someone who seemed less steady. Thompson can say radical things and nobody turns a hair. If any other candidate talked about overhauling social security and the tax code while we fight a global war of which Iraq and Afghanistan are mere outcroppings, a substantial part of the electorate would faint dead away. Try to wrap your mind around the reality that coming off like an old coot having a conversation as he whittles next to the pot-bellied stove down at the country store is an excellent way to attract most American voters.
… The best way for a Republican to beat Hillary is to talk to the American people calmly, simply and sensibly, and let her be the poster child for all the bitterness and anger of the last decade.
After a recent Thompson speech in Iowa a member of the audience called out: “Kill the terrorists, secure the border, and give me back my freedom.” Thompson replied “you just summed up my whole speech.”
No other candidate could have carried off that quip because no other candidate is capable of delivering a convincing speech focused on those powerful themes.

This is my point too. Fred is the right guy at the right time for the right reasons. The proof? Watch the midget minded bm.org patsies get shrieking louder and louder as the election nears. Every inconceivable smear by every lying leftist out there will sound a cacophony of shrill groans, allied closely with warnings from ubl, akman, and the rest of their terrified cohorts.

My point? The one that the muslim/democrat defeat America first coalition fears most is the one I’ll vote for. Join up, America is worthy of preservation for a few more centuries, know what I mean?

Advertisements

Posted in conservatism, GOP, politics, republican | Leave a Comment »

a thing about civilization

Posted by Citizen on July 17, 2007

This has been around for a while, that’s why I just discovered it and want to pass it on. This cuts both ways of course, guns in a lawless society make for coersion, but that coersion always exists in tyrannies, even if it’s knives or clubs. This is why we treasure our liberty. This is why we abhor those who would deprive us of it. Like OSHA, for example.

why the gun is civilization.

Human beings only have two ways to deal with one another: reason and force. If you want me to do something for you, you have a choice of either convincing me via argument, or force me to do your bidding under threat of force. Every human interaction falls into one of those two categories, without exception. Reason or force, that’s it. RTWT, it’s worth it.

This is well reasoned and well written. It will get ‘yea and amen’ from more than half the country, the polite half..,

Posted in civilization, conservatism, conservatives, OSHA | Leave a Comment »